why is carpentry good for children?

Develop fine and gross motor skills and hand-eye coordination. Grow socially and emotionally through self-confidence, responsibility, appreciation for oneself and others, and respect for materials and safety.

why is carpentry good for children?

Develop fine and gross motor skills and hand-eye coordination. Grow socially and emotionally through self-confidence, responsibility, appreciation for oneself and others, and respect for materials and safety. Creativity in the wood band goes hand in hand. Those who are used to working with wood tend to be more creative, as they have to make new and useful things out of ordinary wood and have to deal with a lot of problems related to woodworking.

Therefore, woodworking is a suitable hobby for children, who have more room to grow (both physically and mentally) compared to adults. Not only can they find projects created with plans and goals in mind, but children who have experience in woodworking can start to create their own patterns, projects and bring their creative ideas to life. Woodworking is a unique activity for children to learn. For example, children can work with natural materials and use real tools to solve unexpected problems.

They can also express themselves and follow their curiosities while playing with wood. Woodworking is an ideal way to help children work in their "zone of proximal development". Children can be taught to use the woodworking area appropriately and to learn to respect tools, just as in any other area of the classroom. James Lochead-Macqua is an active researcher on woodworking in early childhood education and is an honorary research fellow at the University of Bristol's Graduate School of Education.

See also James Lochead-MacMillan's article on how his centre engaged in self-revision of the woodwork area and turned a Wendy's house into a popular workshop space. Visiting teachers observing the woodworking area always notice the children's deep levels of concentration and engagement, and are surprised to find that the same children are still working on their creations an hour or two later. For example, Peter recommends introducing woodworking to first year pre-school children by allowing them to play with wooden blocks and objects. The Big Bang project is supported by a number of stakeholders, including Irresistible Learning, the University of Bristol, Routledge and the Early Childhood Woodworking Association.

Woodwork, once almost eradicated due to fear of litigation, is making a comeback in early childhood. This article presents a review of Peter Moorhouse's book "Learning Through Woodwork", a great publication for practitioners that highlights the importance of woodworking in the early years. Woodwork with young children provides the ideal foundation for STEAM in primary and secondary education as it links directly to all STEAM subjects. My favourite part of "Learning Through Woodwork" is the section on woodworking projects that can be done in early childhood centres.

The children's behaviour is exemplary at the woodwork bench: they are engaged and doing something they love. Woodworking incorporates mathematical thinking, scientific investigation, developing knowledge of technology, a deeper understanding of the world, as well as physical development and coordination, communication and language, personal and social development. For example, how children can be sequentially introduced to basic woodworking tools such as hammers, pliers and sandpaper. Through hands-on learning, children are building a foundation in their STEAM thinking skills and are much more likely to develop an interest in and pursue STEAM topics - so again woodworking could be seen as beneficial to the wider narrative.

Georgia Fortin
Georgia Fortin

Friendly bacon buff. Total tv nerd. Wannabe bacon enthusiast. Freelance bacon nerd. Typical beer fanatic.

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